Posts Tagged ‘stretching’

Always Stretch Before You Train

Friday, July 1st, 2011

Should Bodybuilders Use Static Stretching Before a Workout?

Isometric Calf Stretch

It’s such a simple component of your workout routine that you may not even think about it. You might just automatically hit the mats before you train, to stretch every muscle group for 20 seconds. If you haven’t been reading Project Swole or other popular fitness blogs in the last 5 years, you might even think this practice is good for you. Think again.

If you have been reading fitness blogs, websites, magazines, or keeping up to date on regular fitness news, you would know by now that this myth has been debunked. It has been decided with 100% assurance whether you should or shouldn’t stretch before weight lifting. So what is the final answer?

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Workout at Work

Friday, March 5th, 2010

By: Trainer to the Stars Cornel Chin

Celebrity Body on a Budget
Celebrity Body on a Budget

If you’re one of many who work in an office and find yourself seated at a desk for prolonged periods of time, then you’re asking for trouble. The mass office working culture has led to more sedentary lifestyles.

Your body is designed for movement, so sitting for long hours at a time doesn’t do your body any favors. It’s therefore vital that you find ways to move around in order to keep the circulation in your body moving and to stave off unwanted fat or weight that may well be creeping up. Staying stationery for long periods can also lead to backache, stiffness and headaches.

If you don’t even get up and move around every so often you’ll gradually begin to feel uncomfortable, your energy level’s decline, and you’ll probably feel lethargic and possibly begin to lack concentration resulting in below par productivity.

Office exercises isn’t a total replacement of your regular exercise routine but it will help to keep you active, burn off the excesses of the day and hopefully give you the motivation to partake in regular exercise to keep your body trim and healthy.

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How to Maintain Flexibility

Sunday, February 21st, 2010
Swole Fitness Tips

Keep your muscles limber by holding static stretches for 30 seconds if you are under 30 years old. For every ten additional years of your life, you should add 10 seconds to your stretch.

Example: in your 30’s you should be holding a stretch for 40 seconds, in your 40’s hold it for 50 seconds, in your 50’s it should be a 60 second hold, and so on.

The reason is for this is that your muscles are less pliable as you get older. You need to stretch them for longer periods of time to remain flexible in your old age.

Static stretching should always be completed after your regular exercise routine. Dynamic and PNF stretching can be done during warm-ups or after regular training. If you are interested, you should read more about Flexibility Training.

What is Static Stretching?

Tuesday, September 29th, 2009

Before we really get into static stretching, you can take a minute to learn more about flexibility training.

The goal of static stretching is to gradually increase the length of the muscles. Static stretching can be done by anyone, regardless of age, weight, or fitness level, and stretches can be modified to meet the specific flexibility of an athlete.

Flexible Woman
Static Stretching Makes You Flexible

There is lots to learn about flexibility, so now we will examine the hows, whys, whens, and wheres of using static stretching exercises.

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What is Flexibility Training?

Monday, September 21st, 2009
Flexible Woman
Flexible Woman

How to Stretch for Strength

Flexibility training is one of the most under-utilized and under-appreciated components of fitness.

Stretching has been under constant scrutiny from fitness experts who question the role of flexibility in injury prevention. Despite the debate, athletes can enhance recovery and performance from a stretching regime, and in my opinion the right kind of stretching used at the right time definitely helps to prevent injury.

Most any powerful sports movement you can think of, can benefit from flexibility. From a football punt, to sprints, to swimming, to a tennis back swing, all intense moves need prior warm up and can often generate more power with an increased range of motion (ROM).

The simplest way to stretch for strength is to use dynamic stretching drills before exercise and modified static stretching drills after exercise. It is actually much more complex than that, so keep reading to find out more.

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