Posts Tagged ‘fat’

The US Obesity Epidemic in Recent Years

Saturday, February 4th, 2012
Obesity in the US
Obesity in the US

Dietary Fat is Bad for You

Thursday, June 30th, 2011

Should Bodybuilders Restrict Their Intake of Dietary Fat?

Dietary Fat is Bad

We all know sugar is bad. It is fun to eat but it is bad for your body. It belongs on the bodybuilding blacklist, I’ve got no qualms there. We all know protein is good for bodybuilding. That is a simple and obvious discussion. But what about fat?

Possibly left over from the 1980’s war on fat, a common myth is that fat calories have no place in a healthy diet, let alone a bodybuilding diet. Around that time fat was demonized and carbohydrates were praised. The myth still lingers, but isn’t it time to let that battle go?

The Myth

A bodybuilding diet consists of lean meats like turkey, chicken, fish, egg whites, and fat free dairy products. Bodybuilding newbies learn this practice almost immediately. We must keep calories low, so we must keep fat consumption low.

Being Overweight Could Cost You More Than $8000 a Year

Wednesday, September 22nd, 2010

Obesity is Expensive

Consider the statistics:

  • 72 million adults are considered obese (defined by the BMI being over 30)
  • 84.8 million adults have no leisure-time physical activity
  • total obesity-related health care costs are estimated at $147 billion

Those are some frustrating numbers.

Given those ridiculous health care costs, and all the other money that you have to shell out food, clothing, fad weight loss gimmicks, etc… just how much does it cost annually for the average person to be obese?

A recent study conducted by George Washington University researchers found that the annual cost of being overweight is $8,365 for men and $6,518 for women with an obesity-related shortened life span factored in.


How to Meet Proper Fat Intake Recommendations

Wednesday, May 5th, 2010
Dr. John Berardi
John Berardi

Since the late 1990’s Dr. John Berardi has published 8 scientific abstracts; 15 scientific papers and textbook chapters; presented at nearly 50 scientific, exercise, and nutrition related conferences; and published countless articles online.

His first articles at Testosterone Magazine so many years ago, provided me with the basis for everything I know about nutrition today. Now I will turn some of that knowledge over to you in the form of Nutrition Tips written by Dr. Berardi himself.

Today’s Topic – How to Meet Fat Intake Recommendations


Fat Folk Encouraged to Get Fatter to Qualify for Bariatric Surgery

Thursday, January 21st, 2010

Yes you read that right. In certain postal codes in England, severely overweight people are being denied life-saving surgery because it is not cost effective.

Severe clinical obesity can be life threatening.

The National Health Service (NHS), the name commonly used to refer to the three publicly funded health care systems in England, is telling people that they don’t qualify for surgery even though they are clinically obese.

Some people in more affluent postal codes with lower BMIs qualify for surgery right away, while the lower and middle class are being told to get fatter so that they will develop life-threatening complications, which will then qualify them for surgery. This policy allows some people with BMI of 40 to get the surgery, while others with BMI of 60 are labeled as “too skinny”, simply because of where they live.


Read more: Obese patients ‘encouraged to put on weight to qualify for surgery’

California Bans Trans-Fats in Restaurants

Monday, January 4th, 2010

Happy New Year!


Project Swole readers already know that trans-fats are bad for us. We also know partially hydrogenated oils are bad for us. These fats are not essential and should comprise about 0.0% of our dietary intake of fats. Now those who have homes or apartments in California can rest easy because trans-fats are on their way out!

Several states have already banned partially hydrogenated oil in restaurants, but California is the first one to outlaw trans-fats with fines of up to $1000 for an infraction. You can thank our hero Arnold Schwarzenegger for this latest step to improving the American diet.

Trans-fats are arguably the worst fats you can eat, but should the government have the right to make laws against selling those foods in restaurants?


What Kind of Fat Should You Eat?

Tuesday, December 8th, 2009
Dr. John Berardi
John Berardi

Since the late 1990’s Dr. John Berardi has published 8 scientific abstracts; 15 scientific papers and textbook chapters; presented at nearly 50 scientific, exercise, and nutrition related conferences; and published countless articles online.

His first articles at Testosterone Magazine so many years ago, provided me with the basis for everything I know about nutrition today. Now I will turn some of that knowledge over to you in the form of Nutrition Tips written by Dr. Berardi himself.

Today’s Topic – What kind of fat you should eat.


10 Ways To Stop Pouring Fat Directly Into Your Body

Tuesday, September 1st, 2009

Commenting on a New York City initiative to curb the consumption of unhealthy beverages, New York City Health Commissioner Thomas A. Farley recently said:

“Sugary drinks shouldn’t be a part of our everyday diet.

Drinking beverages loaded with sugars increases the risk of obesity and associated problems, particularly diabetes but also heart disease, stroke, arthritis and cancer.”

The reality according to the health department is that on average, Americans now consume 200 to 300 more calories each day than 30 years ago. Nearly half of these extra calories come from sugar-sweetened drinks.

When health department researchers surveyed adult New Yorkers about their consumption of soda and other sweetened drinks, the findings showed that more than 2 million NY citizens drink at least one sugar-sweetened soda or other sweetened beverage each day, equaling as much as 250 calories a pop.

People often feel bad about stirring one or two tablespoons of sugar into their morning coffee, but they don’t blink an eyelash when chugging down a soda, iced tea, coffee, or sports drink with 16 teaspoons of sugar in one can.

Are You Pouring on the Pounds?
Are You Pouring on the Pounds?

Here are 10 ways you can avoid pouring body fat directly into your skin:


How Much Fat Should I Eat in a Day?

Monday, April 7th, 2008

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Almost all nutritious food has fat in it. Fats are used for a variety of purposes including transporting vital nutrients to cells, assisting in digestion of certain foods, and providing us with energy in times of nutrient depletion. To be healthy you can’t, and shouldn’t, stay away from fat. Still we find ourselves asking: how much fat should I eat in a day? What are the pros and cons of eating low-fat or fat-free? What kind of fat should I be eating most? Which foods provide healthy fats and which foods will kill me quickly?

As with my other articles how many carbs to eat in a day and how much protein to eat in a day, it all depends on a couple factors:

  • current bodyweight
  • dietary goals
  • cholesterol profile
  • activity level
  • lifestyle
  • time of day

The American Heart Association recommends limiting dietary fat to 30% of total calories. Take into consideration however, if you are overweight, need to lower blood cholesterol, or have another medical concern, you may need less than the recommended 30%.

Why do I Need to Eat Fat?

Fats are vital to many of the body’s primary functions, specifically digestion and nutrient absorption. The main form of fat found in food and also found in the body, makes up most of the body’s stored energy. You may have heard of these type of fats before, we call them triglycerides. When your body is at rest or performing activity of a low intensity, it generates most of its energy from free fatty acids, which are released from the body’s stores of triglycerides.

The calories in fat molecules (9 calories per gram) provide more than twice as much energy as carbs and protein (4 calories per gram). This is especially true in a glycogen depleted state, in which the body turns to fat for nearly all of its energy.

Lipids (fats) in foods transport fat-soluble vitamins to the intestines. This facilitates the absorption of of many vital nutrients such as A ,D, E and K. You risk developing deficiencies for some of these nutrients without an adequate amount of fat in your diet.

Eating foods that are high in fat helps us moderate our appetite through two means:

  1. fat satiates hunger; you feel more satisfied after eating when you consume a meal higher in fat
  2. since fat digests slower than carbs or protein, the presence of fat in the digestive system slows down the digestion process. This means a higher fat meal will stay in your stomach longer than a lower fat meal.

You might find yourself faced with increased hunger when your intake of calories from fat is reduced below 20% of total caloric intake.

Omega-3s and Omega-6s, the essential fatty acids, need to be ingested as part of the diet, as they cannot be manufactured within the body. These nutrients are the essential building blocks of compounds and molecules that are responsible for performing vital bodily functions such as helping blood to clot, immune system response, and blood pressure regulation. In women, the essential fatty acids also aid in healthy childbirth. The essential fatty acids can be found in foods containing soybean or canola oil, as well as in sardines, tuna, and salmon.

We also need to be aware that when fat is removed from most foods, the food manufacturers usually add carbohydrates in order to perserve a desirable taste and texture. Typically these carbohydrates are the worst kind of carbs for your body as they are mostly high-glycemic, processed refined sugars. Many low-fat and fat-free products remain energy dense for just this reason, since they still contain a high concentration of calories from carbohydrates rather than fat. I rant about low-fat and fat-free foods in another article.

We always need to remember that the source of our calories counts. Whether they come from fat, protein, or carbs we always need to be sure to use moderation when choosing portion sizes, even when eating fat-reduced foods. By now everyone is aware that the increasing variety of lower fat items is directly proportional to the American publics average weight going up, up, up. As I mentioned in my article about the hidden dangers of “healthy” foods, eating reduced fat or fat free is not the solution for weight loss. In fact, eating too many of these foods over the course of our childhood, teenage, and young adult years, can often lead to nasty diseases such as adult-onset type II diabetes.

Why Should I Stay Away From Fat?

The answer is simple: you shouldn’t. The folks that should really stay away from fat the most are those with high cholesterol, and even then, they should be sure to consume the proper ratio and amounts of Omega-6 and Omega-3 fatty acids to stay healthy. If you have been told by your doctor that you need to reduce cholesterol, you should attempt to stay away from pork, beef, and eggs. Also check labels often for cholesterol content, because something like a salad dressing might contain more cholesterol than you think.

If you are extremely overweight, you will probably want to go easy on the fat only because it is so calorie dense. But in the same respect, if you are willing to bring your carbohydrate intake under 100 grams per day, then you should replace those lost carbs with protein and healthy fats.

When Should I Stay Away From Fat?

During the day you will probably want to stay away from fat late at night, and anytime near or around a workout. You want glycogen to be readily available, so you won’t want slow down digestion by consuming fat before or during a workout. Doing so would also steal blood away from your extremities to send to the stomach to assist with digestion. It may sound petty, but every little bit counts. You also want to get fat-free glycogen back into the muscles ASAP after training. Therefore your post workout shake should contain 0 grams of fat if possible. As usual, I recommend Biotest Surge as a post-workout drink.

In conclusion we can say that fat is good. Deriving 30-40% of your daily calories from fat is acceptable. Try to eat healthy fats from fruits, veggies, fish, eggs, nuts, and canola/soybean/olive oil. Minimize trans fats and saturated fats, making sure not to eat fats that are solid at room temperature like butter and animal fat. Try not to cook with fat either, since cooking healthy fats actually makes them unhealthy fats.

Eating a lower calorie, higher protein, higher healthy fat, lower carb kind of diet is one sure way to stay healthy and lose some weight. This is the type of lifestyle that can be permanent and effective!

See also:
How many grams of carbs should I eat?
How many grams of protein should I eat?