Weight Training is More than Just About Building Muscles

Women Weight TrainingWhen it comes to lifting weights, most people have the wrong perception. Weight training does not necessarily equate to bodybuilding and its benefits are not limited to aesthetic muscle growth either. It is a principle that can be used to achieve a variety of goals for both men and women. In fact, all kinds of athletes and sportsmen use different variants of weight training to boost specific aspects of their game. As the general consensus is that the only ones who lift are the people who want to get jacked, let us take a closer look at what else weight training can do to help your health.

It Will Slow the Aging Process

Lifting weight directly counters multiple effects of aging such as loss of muscle mass, muscle functioning and strength. Studies have now proven that resistance training can indeed slow down the aging process and in some cases, may even reverse it by a few biological years on a genetic level. Additionally, senior citizens who engage in systematic weight training on a regular basis are found to be physiologically and psychologically more alert than others of their age group. Wrinkles around the neck region are one of the most obvious signs of aging and can make even the healthiest person look older than he/she actually is. Fortunately, even that can be countered with a series of exercises for neck wrinkles which can smooth out those creases and folds in just a few weeks.

Weight Training Can Help You Lose Weight

In spite of being viewed primarily as a gym routine that promotes bulking up, resistance training is also an excellent way to lose fat. There is no doubt that cardiovascular activity helps you to lose weight, but when you supplement those cardio sessions with adequate lifting sessions, you lose more fat and less muscle. This is the ideal approach when it comes to building a leaner, fitter body, irrespective of the gender.

In addition to the calories burned at the gym, someone who lifts weights will also be burning quite a few calories outside the gym, even while sleeping. After a heavy weight training session, the body uses multiple calories throughout the entire day to repair the damaged fibers, so that the muscle can grow back stronger. In fact, if you are feeling up to it, you can ask your trainer to introduce you to circuit training with weights; a method which has the potential to help you burn more calories in five minutes than you can in a regular half-hour cardio session.

Recent studies have show an average 75% increased efficiency for fat loss when combining diet and exercise, versus either method alone.

Mental Stamina

An underrated, but extremely powerful side effect of intense resistance training is increased mental acuitiy. Pushing through difficult reps, tweaking form to increase or decrease the difficultly of certain exercises, the focus and min-fullness used to correctly execute complex movements under heavy loads… all of these skills translate well to real life. Whether in business, relationships with family, or setting and pursuing other personal goals – Resistance training can help you build a stronger mental foundation.

Healthy Bones

Weight training increases bone density and that can come in particularly handy as you begin to age and your bones become weaker with each passing year. Weight training from an early age can protect a person from osteoporosis in the later years. Anyone who has been lifting for more than four months can be tested for elevated levels of blood osteocalcin, indicating bone reinforcement.

Weight training also helps against depression, anxiety and stress, while improving productivity, cognitive abilities and cardiovascular health. As you can see, going to the gym and lifting weights under proper guidance has more benefits than just building a muscular physique. Besides, with regular training, proper diet and nutrition, you do get the muscular physique as well!

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